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31 (More) Days of #BIF7 - Day 10 - Andrew Losowsky

BIF-6 storyteller Alan Webber reminded us last year that “facts are facts but stories are how we learn", and this year BIF-7 speaker Andrew Losowsky dove into the meta of story.

With animated hand gestures, Andrew drew a mime box in the air and called it a "possible space". Inside the possible space, he drew a circle. This, he said, is the "likely space". What I loved about the allegorical constructs is how they demonstrated (better than any slideshow or presentation deck) the normative, the drifters, and the innovators.

Moving on, Andrew suggested that if he clapped his hands it would be a cue for one of the BIF theater workers to shut off all the lights. He then made as if to clap his hands and stopped short. A barely perceptible susurrus of a anxiety passed over and through the audience. The edge of the possible might be stimulating and a rich channel for innovation, but it can also be unsettling.

Consider Samuel Beckett's classic Waiting for Godot in which two men wait for another who never comes. The entire play takes place at the very edge of the possible space, and the reader is never quite allowed to settle into a comfortable plot narrative. Be that as it may, many are drawn to the edge of the possible space, to try out a new idea or to improve something. Like Andrew Losowsky, who found Godot a long time ago.

INT. BIF THEATER.

The sound of clapping hands.

FADE TO BLACK.


Additional information:

http://www.losowsky.com/

Andrew Losowsky on Twitter:@twitsplosion

BIF Profile Page
http://businessinnovationfactory.com/iss/innovators/andrew-losowsky


This is part of my 31 (More) Days of #BIF7 blog series.

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