Skip to main content

Switch by Chip Heath and Dan Heath (Book Review)

Switch is a smoothly readable and deceptively simple book about making lasting change.

To set the stage for change, the authors contend that you need to do three fundamental things: speak to people's rational site and provide direction, appeal to people's emotional side and stir feelings, and shape the way forward. It doesn't matter if the change is directed at a person, group, or organization - the principles are basically the same in all instances.

I loved the clear-headed logic in Switch and the many anecdotes of everyday people who achieved dramatic change results. For example, there's a teacher who helped motivate under-performing first graders by challenging them to perform as well as third-graders. Then there's a manager who helped executives feel the need to drive down purchasing costs by literally stacking 424 different types of gloves on a conference room table to show the different prices and glaring lack of economies of scale. There are also stories of organizations making changes, including the tale of how Rackspace became "fanatical" about customer support.

You can read more about Switch and author Chip Heath and Dan Heath at heathbrothers.com.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

2014 IBM Digital Experience Conference

In July, I will be presenting at the 2014 IBM Digital Experience Conference, an event focused on the latest technologies, best practices, and the business benefits of delivering great digital experiences. Below is the description for my session: Session:  BUS-S20 Date/Time:   Monday, July 21, 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM Successfully Enabling Enterprise Content Management, Cloud, Mobile, and Social Business at Superior Group Superior Group focuses on the agile delivery of people, process and project outsourcing solutions. Our session will detail how this organization accelerated its content management and social business needs by implementing a combination of content management, cloud, mobile, and collaboration solutions. Attend this session and you will have an opportunity to learn from Frank Gullo, Director of Digital and Mobile Strategy at Superior Group and IBM Social Business Insights blog contributor, on how a mid-sized organization transformed its digital capabilities a

Configuring a Wireless HP Photosmart C4380

Updated on 2009-11-16: It's been over a year since I wrote this, and lot of people continue to find this page from Google, which leads me to believe that people are still having problems with their HP Photosmart C4380s. For the record, over a year later the workaround I detailed here is still working for me. If you have something to add that might help others, please feel free to add to the comments. The original post follows below. ##   So, we bought a wireless printer. After some initial back and forth, we settled on a wireless HP Photosmart C4380. I thought we did a fair bit of research before purchasing the product, but apparently not enough, as there were many issues and surprises that we discovered only after we setup the device. I'm posting this to relate the significant difficulties we encountered setting up the printer and post workarounds I've implemented for the benefits of others who might be considering this product or who may have already purchased it

The Chaneysville Incident by John Bradley

I read a lot of books, and sometimes even manage to comment about them here. More often that not, I enjoy most of the books I post about. This is probably because (admittedly) I look for books by authors I already know or that I have an inkling -- from word of mouth or reviews -- that I'll enjoy. Still, you never know when you're going to read a book that you really like or that makes others pale in comparison. The Chaneysville Incident is such a novel. I came to read The Chaneysville Incident after asking for suggestions for a big book for my long flights to and from Japan. One of my work colleagues suggested it, and though I'd never heard of it or author John Bradley, I decided to give it a try. I'm really glad I did. On the surface, the novel is a well-honed and affecting story of historian John Washington's attempt to discover what happened to thirteen runaway slaves in Chaneysville, Pennsylvania. The protagonist's efforts to reconstruct the past eleva