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Showing posts from December, 2009

Day 25: A Christmas Story

When I conceived and started the 25 Days of Christmas blog series, I didn't know all the topics I would post about or the item I would feature on Christmas Day. I figured my bias would slant toward It's a Wonderful Life or A Christmas Carol, because of their strong, emotional stories and staying power.

I knew I always liked A Christmas Story, but it wasn't until I started thinking about just how well the movie captured what it felt like to be nine years old during Christmas that I knew it would be my Day 25 choice.

When you're nine, there's that one gift you want for Christmas above all else that interjects so much high drama and gravitas to the Christmas season. You're so excited for Christmas that the days leading up to the holiday seem to go on forever and you wonder if Christmas will ever arrive. Though there's some anxiety that accompanies the wait for Santa and the uncertainty that you'll get that one gift you want, the relative slow-moving days a…

Day 24: It's a Wonderful Life

At some point in It's a Wonderful Life, George Bailey begins to resemble one of the many men Thoreau foresaw leading lives of "quiet desperation". There are so many reasons why this is a great Christmas movie, but what's always stood out for me is the honesty of George's desperation.

Many of us know what it's like to pine for better opportunities and are one medical illness away from financial ruin. What the movie does so well is remind us to keep perspective, and remember our family and friends and all the things we have instead of what we don't.

This is part of my 25 Days of Christmas blog series.

Day 23: A Christmas Carol

A Christmas Carol is of course one of the most celebrated and timeless Christmas stories of all time. The redemption of Ebenezer Scrooge -- in both the original text and movie sources -- is one of those moments that transcends its material and is truly timeless.

Everybody has a favorite, of course, and I'm no different. I prefer reading the original Dickens novella and watching the 1984 George C. Scott film version. Every year I try and read the novella or watch the movie.

I love the story. It's a tale of hope with a stirring message that it's never too late to change. Perhaps Scrooge's nephew, Fred, says it best:
I have always thought of Christmas time, when it has come around apart from the veneration due to its sacred name and origin, if anything belonging to it can be apart from that -- as a good time; a kind, forgiving, charitable, pleasant time; the only time I know of the long calendar of the year, when men and women seem by one consent to open their shut-up hear…

Day 22: Do They Know It's Christmas?

Do They Know It's Christmas? is a song written by Bob Geldof and Midge Ure in 1984 to raise money for famine relief in Africa. Those of you who are my age surely remember this recording, when a young Bono and Sting sang side by side for a cause. Sadly, while it's now been 25 years since the original recording, we still have a long way to go to eradicate poverty, malnourishment, and disease.

If it's been a while since you've heard this, or if the song is new to you, have a listen:



Link to video on YouTube

This is part of my 25 Days of Christmas blog series.

Day 21: Bad Santa

Now we're talking.

Bad Santa is crude, lewd, and utterly irreverent. But it's also hilarious and, in my opinion, the best Christmas comedy of them all.

This movie works and is funny in so many ways that a lesser film like Scrooged is not because it starts with a bad, drunken Santa (played by Billie Bob Thornton) premise and carries it through for the whole movie. It doesn't compromise or cheat to a happy ending. Yes, there is a lonely uncool kid who attaches himself to Santa. But instead of the redemption arc, where the kid helps the bad Santa become a better person, it's Santa who helps the kid become a little bad and less of a loser.

Of course this film isn't for everyone. My wife, for one, detests the movie, and refuses to watch it with me. But for people who know that sometimes a movie is very funny and "not about what it is about" [1] , Bad Santa is a holiday gem.

[1] Roger Ebert, Review of "Bad Santa"


This is part of my 25 Days of Christma…

Day 20: Rob

Rob is a non-fiction column I wrote a few years ago in remembrance of my cousin.

Though in the strictest terms it's not a Christmas piece, I am inclined to include it here, as I invariably think of Rob during the holidays.

I've reproduced the piece in its entirety below and also linked to an audio clip that features me reading the column for a local radio station.

##

Rob
by Frank Gullo

Our current mythology views ghosts as wayward, incomplete, or even destructive spirits. Films and horror fiction typically depict ghosts as vengeful entities, lingering to haunt or mete punishment for forgotten victims and wrongs that have not been brought to justice. Often, ghosts characterized in this fashion act as they do because they cannot pass on to a higher state until some unfinished matter on the earthly plane is resolved.

Sometimes, though, ghosts are not apparitions that linger because they are trapped by their past earthly life. Instead, ghosts are more often memorials shading throu…

Day 19: A Charlie Brown Christmas

Of all the Christmas specials for children, in my opinion, A Charlie Brown Christmas is the best.

Funny and ultimately affirming for both kids and adults, A Charlie Brown Christmas achieves what few specials can match: it manages to keep a balanced perspective about Christmas, even admitting to the commercialism of the holiday with a healthy cynicism.

But as it teeters toward becoming something more jaded, the story turns and we learn that one of the reasons Christmas is so special is that it's one of the few days when people really come together, when your nemesis doesn't pull the football away before you can kick it, and when a little love and caring go a long way, to dress up a scraggly looking tree and to comfort and cheer each other.



Merry Christmas, Charlie Brown!


This is part of my 25 Days of Christmas blog series.

Day 18: When Santa Turned Green

When Santa Turned Green is a timely and urgent holiday story for children that begins with a drop of water falling on Santa's head and him realizing that the North Pole is melting. The book goes on to explain about global warming and introduces the notion of environmental awareness and little things we all can do that make a big difference.

My wife and I are committed to raising our daughter to respect and help preserve the planet, and though she's probably too young for this story this year, I thought it deserved a mention in this Christmas blog series.

One comment for any climate change deniers who may be tempted to impugn the idea of this book and challenge me for including it. Before commenting, first read this post by Scientific American and return only when you've provided peer reviewed evidence that proves that human interference is not impacting the Earth's climate.


This is part of my 25 Days of Christmas blog series.

Day 17: The Polar Express

The film version of The Polar Express deftly combines traditional Christmas elements in a fun, adventure story. This comes together as a young boy boards a train on Christmas Eve headed for the North Pole. On the trip, he encounters other children and sees many fascinating things, and ultimately receives a "gift" of Christmas.


This is part of my 25 Days of Christmas blog series.

Day 16: A Very Special Christmas

The original A Very Special Christmas album came out in 1989, when I was a senior in high school, and it always felt like my Christmas album. The interpretations were fresh, and the artists were varied and contemporary. Good stuff.




This is part of my 25 Days of Christmas blog series.

Girl With a Pearl Earring by Tracy Chevalier (Book Review)

Set in Holland in the 1660s, Girl With a Pearl Earring is a novel about a young woman who inspired one of Vemeer's most famous paintings.

The novel is sensational. The writing is simple and elegant, and the words and pages disappear as the plot and historical landscape come alive.

Highly recommended.

Day 15: Santa Claus Is Comin' to Town

You don't often think of Santa Claus as a defiant Robin Hood outlaw constantly on the run from a mean-spirited despot. Or as a young man who falls in love.

In Santa Claus Is Comin' to Town, though, we get the origin story of Santa Claus and learn how he came of age as Kris Kringle and how several Christmas traditions came to be.

I really enjoyed the special as a child, and always thought it felt unique as Santa-fare went. The Burgermeister and Sombertown, in particular, overlayed speculative and serious elements to traditional Christmas tropes that bolstered the story and Santa mythology. Santa as a merry toymaker who gives presents to boys and girls is one thing, but the legend looms even larger when we learn he grew into this role while resisting a dictator.



This is part of my 25 Days of Christmas blog series.

Day 14: Best TV Sitcom Christmas Episodes

As I began formulating this Christmas blog series, I quickly realized that I was interested in doing at least one post highlighting famous Christmas-themed sitcom episodes. At the time, I thought it would be easy to pick and prune from existing lists, but I didn't find as many out there as I thought.

So, I've cobbled together my own. Call it my seven favorite TV sitcom Christmas episodes.

Friends - "The One With Christmas in Tulsa" Season 9 - December 12, 2002
In this episode, Chandler is miserably spending Christmas working in Tulsa, while the rest of the group is celebrating the holiday back in New York. The episode memorably ends with the gang in NY opening presents, when Chandler opens the door and announces he's quit his job.
I always liked the ending of this one, and its the one and only Friends Christmas episode I remember.


Frasier - "Frasier Grinch" Season 3 - December 19, 1995
Determined to buy his son Frederick only high-end educational toys for Chri…

Day 13: The 10 Least Successful Holiday Specials of All Time

Power blogger John Scalzi has compiled a list of the 10 worst holiday specials ever. This list is frighteningly funny, with doozies such as The Lost Star Trek Christmas Episode: “A Most Illogical Holiday”, A Muppet Christmas with Zbigniew Brzezinski, and The Village People in Can’t Stop the Christmas Music.

Link to Original Post



This is part of my 25 Days of Christmas blog series.

Day 12: Frosty the Snowman

Frosty the Snowman is another one of those classic holiday TV specials from the 60s/70s that I loved as a kid.

What I always found interesting about the Frosty story (more so than other favorites like Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer and Santa Claus Is Comin' to Town) was the emphasis on the seasons and cycles and the implication that you really need to appreciate things while they are here.

Frosty, after all, like Christmas, like Santa, and like winter, only comes around for a brief time each year. So, enjoy him and enjoy the moment when you can. Frosty vivimus, vivamus.


This is part of my 25 Days of Christmas blog series.

Day 11: Green Days of Christmas

Here's something different. Green Days of Christmas remasters signature Green Day numbers as Christmas songs.

I'm not sure about this. The transformed Green Day songs, recorded with Christmas sounds, feel too neutered and defanged. I suppose that's kind of the point, but I love the originals too much to hear them schmaltzed with jingle bells.

Your mileage may vary, though.



Link to video on YouTube


This is part of my 25 Days of Christmas blog series.

Day 10: A Miracle on 34th Street

Today's Christmas post comes from my wife who, when I asked her for a contribution to this list, quickly came back with the original A Miracle on 34th Street.

As this is a Christmas film I've never seen in its entirety (something I hope to rectify this year), I was curious why she liked it so much.

She said, foremost, that it's a great story that not only connects with traditional Christmas themes but, in its own right, illustrates the power of hope and faith. Beyond that, my wife said that she thought the film was ahead of its time (it came out in 1947) and deserving of respect for featuring a divorced, single mother as the female lead.

This is part of my 25 Days of Christmas blog series.

Day 9: A Twisted Christmas

If, like me, you grew up during the 1980s, you remember the halcyon days of Heavy Metal, when bands like Motley Crue, Def Leppard, Iron Maiden, Ozzy Osbourne, and Twisted Sister were all over MTV and selling out arenas nationwide.

For everyone who remembers the music or for anyone who just likes a hard-rocking rendition of a holiday classic, I think you'll enjoy Twisted Sister's "Oh Come All Ye Faithful", from their A Twisted Christmas album.

Link to video on YouTube


This is part of my 25 Days of Christmas blog series.

Day 8: A Charlie Brown Christmas Performed by the Cast of Scrubs

At this point, the television show Scrubs is very much like one of my kids. It doesn't matter how bad the show gets, or how much it may have jumped the shark, or even who's starring in it anymore. I'll always watch it and will support until the end.

So, since its something of an ongoing Christmas Miracle that Scrubs is still on the air, I thought it fitting to reset this great video featuring the cast of Scrubs voicing and re-imagining the classic "A Charlie Brown Christmas". As the story goes, the cast made this video for a Christmas party and it has since found its way onto the web.



Link to video on YouTube


This is part of my 25 Days of Christmas blog series.

Day 7: Christmas in Wartime

Since today (12/7) is the 68th anniversary of the Japanese aerial assault on Pearl Harbor, I thought it appropriate with this Christmas blog post to look back at Christmas during some of America's wars.



This photo collection from the U.S. Army of Military History includes Christmas photos from WWI, WWII, Korea, and Vietnam.


If any of you are unfamiliar with the story of Bastogne and the events of December 25, 1944, I encourage you to read about that Christmas 55 years ago:

Siege of Bastogne
December 1944 White Christmas Red Snow


Finally, back to Pearl Harbor, I found this link through a Google Archive to a story the Hawaii Star Bulletin ran some 10 years ago about Christmas in Hawaii after Pearl Harbor.


Thanks to all of our veterans for your sacrifice and service.


This is part of my 25 Days of Christmas blog series.

Day 6: Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer

Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer is a Christmas classic, and, like millions of other children, I loved it when I was a child.

The story couldn't be more timeless: a misfit runs away after having been mocked mercilessly by his peers. After some time away and self-discovery, he returns and ultimately gains acceptance.



Watching it for the first time in years last week, I found that the story still resonated, though this time I was more attuned to how much of a jerk Santa was to Rudolph in the beginning. Credit the writers for imbuing Santa with some real failings. Still, Rudolph seemed a little too magnanimous when he returns. Yes, he gets to save the day, but it would have been fun if he pelted Fireball with some snowballs or made Santa grovel a little before he agreed to guide his sleigh.

This is part of my 25 Days of Christmas blog series.

Day 5: Zombies and Christmas

Zombies are all the rage these days.

They're in movies like Zombieland, in books like Pride and Prejudice and Zombies, and in video games like Left 4 Dead 2.

Fortunately, this Christmas, thanks to author Michael P. Spradlin, you can also enjoy some zombie Christmas Carols in It's Beginning to Look a Lot Like Zombies: A Book of Zombie Christmas Carols.



This is part of my 25 Days of Christmas blog series.

Day 4: How the Grinch Stole Christmas!

My daughter has become a big fan of Dr. Seuss books, which sets the stage nicely for How the Grinch Stole Christmas!

This was always one of my favorites as a kid, and I still remember sympathizing with the poor Whos in Whoville and holding out hope that it wasn't too late for the Grinch.

This probably the second-best Christmas redemption arc ever. Great stuff.

This is part of my 25 Days of Christmas blog series.

Day 3: Science Fiction Pulps and Christmas

This website features a nice collection of old science fiction pulps with Christmas-themed covers:

A Science Fiction Christmas



This is part of my 25 Days of Christmas blog series.

Day 2: The Star Wars Holiday Special

Christmas is a wonderful time of the year, and sometimes the presents under the tree live up to or exceed the hype. Sometimes, though, a gift misses the mark. Such is the case with holiday specials. Perhaps the best example of a failed holiday special is the The Star Wars Holiday Special, which first aired in 1978 and is widely considered one of the worst holiday specials ever.

I wouldn't bet my life on it, but I have vague memories that make me believe that I watched part or all of it when it aired. I'm thinking that this year I find a copy online and watch it again (or, for the first time, if my memory is incorrect). Even with all the negative criticism, it can't be much worse than The Phantom Menace, could it?

This is part of my 25 Days of Christmas blog series.

Day 1: Emmet Otter's Jug-Band Christmas

I sure loved this as a kid.

Emmet Otter's Jug-Band Christmas is a holiday special that imparts valuable lessons about life as Emmet Otter and his mom both try to win a cash prize in a Christmas musical talent contest. I first saw this when it was airing on HBO in the 1980s.



I can't wait until my daughter is old enough so I can watch this with her.




This is part of my 25 Days of Christmas blog series.

25 Days of Christmas